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The Positive Effects of Hurricanes by CityTech Blogger Matthew Williams

When a hurricane is approaching, most people are only worried about getting prepared for the storm itself. Not many people think about how hurricanes can positively impact the environment. Some of the positive effects include more rainfall, seed dispersal, and habitat modification.  The heavy rainfall of a hurricane can be hazardous, but can also help average rainfall totals in the area. Hurricanes can also aid the spread of seeds in large and small plants in the area. They could also rearrange ecological areas for the betterment of the life around it. It could potentially improve crop growth and “clean” out waterways.

Photo Credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

 
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Global Warming and Coastal Flooding by CityTech Blogger Branden Harris

From what I’ve read about global warning’s effect on coastal flooding I am concerned about what the future holds. As of right now the seas are rising by about an inch per decade. If greenhouse gas emissions aren’t controlled, global seas could rise by 10 inches to 2.5 feet, on average. The higher the sea level rises the more severe coastal flooding will be during storms. I also read that 1-in-100 year flooding events today could happen once a decade by mid-century, and every few years to annually by the end of the century. This all depends on emissions levels. But from the way it’s looking, our emission levels need to be checked as soon as possible or issues like these are more likely to occur in the future.

Photo Credit: Steve Garrington

 
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Vertical Greening by CityTech Blogger Dave

The topic that I have chosen to write about this week is one that I have never heard of before. I saw it while reviewing the sheet that we received in the beginning of the semester on topics to discuss. The topic is vertical greening. Not having any prior experience with the topic of climate change, I decided to look up vertical greening and found a good article that explained what it was. I was surprised to find out what vertical greening actually is. Vertical greening is the planting of greenery on the outside of a building in urban areas which restores urban sustainability. Applying vertical greening systems on new and old buildings can have many environmental benefits like energy savings and water management. Vertical greening and green roofs can help improve air quality by the reduction of pollution, and reduce the heat island effect in urban areas. Plants can collect the carbon dioxide produced by the city and transform them into oxygen, as well as filter any fine dust particles. As vertical greening helps to reduce the urban heat island effect it saves energy because plants provide insulation and shade. This reduces the energy needed to cool a building. Vertical greening could also increase property values due to the aesthetic aspects.

Photo Credit: AsiaOne

 
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Geophysical Research – a great resource by City Tech Blogger Armin Salazar

Hello Fellow Students,
I found this really good geophysical research letter from the AGU publications regarding  the California doubt in 2012 – 2014. I encourage everyone to read it so you can have a understanding of the recent climate problem California has been facing. But also, while reading, to keep in mind the format they are using to write  their paper. You might find it helpful for future assignment and or papers you will have to write as well.

 

 
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Effects of Sea Level Rise in New York by City-Tech Blogger Henry Ovalle

 

Scientists believe that sea level rise caused by global warming present a lot of risk to New York City and Long Island. More than 300,000 people could be affected with just with six feet of sea level rise. Scientist predict that the Atlantic coast including the south of Brooklyn stretching all the way to the end of Long Island could lose land. This event would cost New York billions of dollars since airports, buildings, railroads and industry would be under water. Other areas affected in the vicinity include New Jersey, downtown Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island.

 
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