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Tornado season intensifies, without clear scientific consensus on why

Tornadoes form when warm moist air merges with winds inside a thunderstorm. The number and power of tornadoes this season are uncommonly high, but scientists aren’t sure why. Past statistics help little because storms are tracked far more accurately today. Climate change may affect tornadoes. GR

 
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Midwest flooding

While some parts of the country have seen too little rainfall (see the post on the wildfires in Texas), parts of the Midwest have received record amounts of rainfall.  The excess rainfall has caused severe flooding in many states.  As rivers continue to rise and with more rainfall in the forecast, conditions are likely to

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The Court and global warming

Eight states, including California and New York, are being heard by the Supreme Court for a case that began seven years ago. The plaintiffs are suing six energy corporations that have emitted a quarter of the total CO2 emissions from the US’s electricity sector. What they seek is for these corporations to limit their greenhouse

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Many Mediterranean fish species threatened with extinction, report says

“Just keep swimming, just keep swimming” is quickly becoming “just keep surviving, just keep surviving” for fish in the Mediterranean. According to a report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, fish in the Mediterranean are facing extinction due to overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution. With a focus on the eastern bluefin, there appears

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Texas wildfires

Above normal temperatures, combined with below average rainfall, low humidity, and high winds, have lead to an active fire season in Texas.  Since the start of the fire season, 7,807 fires have affected more than 1.5 million acres.  The fires have a variety of of causes, both natural (ex. lightning) and man-made (ex. fence welding). 

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