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Rebuilding after disaster

A disaster, such as befell Joplin, Missouri, can bring devastation.  But it can also bring opportunity, as this report on Greenburg, Kansas, which was destroyed by a tornado in 2007, shows.  Greenburg has largely rebuilt — sustainably.  Several buildings are LEED certified.  The new school has natural light and geothermal heat, and a wind generator

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The facts (and fiction) of tornadoes

Published on June 8, 2011 by in Observed, Science

Here are some FAQs about tornadoes, courtesy of the New York Times. You might think of this list as everything you always wanted to know about tornadoes, but were afraid to ask. Climate change probably isn’t to blame for this year’s tornedoes, although climate science does predict more weather extremes. GR

 
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Oklahoma, Alabama, Joplin: Why we’re seeing so many tornadoes and superstorm​s

Published on June 1, 2011 by in Observed, Science

This article clearly explains how and why tornadoes form.  It asks what role climate warming plays in this year’s outbreak of damaging tornadoes, but cites research findings that global warming has at most a weak link to tornado formation.  GR

 
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Christie pulls New Jersey from 10-state climate initiative

Last week Governor Christie withdrew New Jersey from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. The multistate program known as RGGI(pronounced Reggie) seeks to lower emissions from power plants and promote renewable energy. Christie called RGGI “a failure,” but other states reaffirmed support. GR

 
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Central China hit by drought, as reservoirs become ‘dead water’

A major drought is affecting more than 600,000 people and 2 million acres of land in Hubei and Henan provinces in central China. Many small reservoirs are so low that water would have to be pumped from them, and 400 million cubic meters of water have been discharged from the Three Gorges Dam. GR

 
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