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E.P.A. Expected to Regulate Carbon Dioxide

Following up on a post from Tuesday, here is a more detailed look at the EPA’s plans to regulate carbon dioxide emissions in the United States. Much of the legislative process surrounding the decision is discussed along with the potential roadblocks to getting the emissions regulations into place.  While it may take some time, this decision by the EPA is quite significant, as the United States will finally take action in the fight against climate change on the national scale and now be able to participate in international efforts starting in late 2009.

 
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Green burials: A dying wish to be ‘home for fish’

Worried that you won’t be able to “go green” enough during your lifetime? 

Well, according to this article, the concept of going green can now extend past your time on Earth.  Focused on reducing their carbon footprint, the death care industry now has alternative ways to ensure that your burial will keep the environment in mind.  According to environmentalists, traditional burial methods are hazardous to the environment and produce emissions which contribute to global warming.  The green burial techniques discussed in the article, which range from biodegradable caskets to incorporating one’s remains into reefs to be placed underwater, will allow you to continue to go green forever.

 
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Five places to go before global warming messes them up

ClimateYou doesn’t usually give travel advice, but we’ll make an exception for this article, which identifies five tourist spots that everyone should plan to visit before global warming impacts them adversely, some but not all due to rising sea levels.  As world travelers, which other places would you suggest be added to the list? Venice, Italy? New York? Lake Okeechobee,Florida?

Please comment with your own suggestions!

 
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EPA to review Bush rule on emissions

Continuing their efforts to reverse the climate change policies of the Bush presidency, the Obama administration agreed Tuesday to review whether or not carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. Previously unregulated under the Clean Air Act, this decision clears the way for the EPA to now cap these emissions, which are in part responsible for global warming.  A victory for scientists and environmentalists, industry officials (energy) fear that restricting emissions could be economically costly to them.

 
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New Antarctic station is carbon-free

One argument preventing more widespread use of renewable energy sources is that they may not be reliable or available in many areas.  Take for example solar energy.  It won’t work well in areas that don’t receive much sun, right? 

With the recent opening of Belgium’s Princess Elisabeth station in East Antarctica, scientists now feel they have proof that there might not be as much strength to that argument as previously thought. Surrounded by  a vast, icy emptiness, the new station is carbon-free, releasing no greenhouse gases (which contribute to climate change) and is powered solely by the sun and wind.  Within the station, water is recycled through the use of micro-organisms.  Scientists believe that if renewable energy can be used in such a harsh environment, what’s to stop it from being used in more habitable parts of the globe. 

Now that the station is up and running, it will serve as a research lab for global scientists studying the Antarctic ice shelf.  The continent is extremely vulnerable to warming temperatures and melting of Antarctica ice shelves increases the flooding threat for many coastal populations.

 
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