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Wind-powered car sets speed record

This apparently serious article illustrates two old sayings: “Truth is stranger than fiction,” and “there’s nothing new under the sun.”  Certainly, it demonstrates that we should never underestimate man’s ingenuity.  And, let’s face it, can your car go 126 mph? 

 
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Energy department maps efficiency money

Just click on your state, then find your city to learn how much stimulus money has been allocated for energy efficiency where you live. Go for it! Be creative! Be bold! Be audacious! Have your say in how the funds designated for your city or town get spent to promote energy efficiency. Lots of luck, and conserve lots of energy.

 
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Study forecasts 297,000 green jobs

One sees a lot of estimates these days as to how many “green jobs” will be generated in the U.S. by a shift away from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy. Self-interested defenders of the status quo tend to come up with low numbers, while ecological enthusiasts predict lots of green jobs. Of course, it helps if everyone uses the same definitions, so we can applaud the Union of Concerned Scientists who have established a “renewable electricity standard” set at 25% by 2025. By this standard, they found, almost 300,000 new green jobs would be created. Job losses from fossilfuel industries would total about 100,000, so the net gain in jobs would be just over 200,000. This is three times as many jobs as would be produced if the country did not shift toward renewables from business as usual fossil fuels. This wide disparity in job creation is due to the high degree of mechanization of the mining sector. Today renewables do require more labor per unit of! energy than fossil fuels, hence could be considered inefficient. Until some future as yet undetermined date, the trade-off is jobs for dollars. In today’s economic environment, creating jobs is critical. However, advocates of green jobs need to keep in mind that all those green jobs may not last forever.

 
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The flight plan for clean air

What’s the best way to regulate greenhouse gases, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or an act of Congress?

This article from the New York Times discusses the pros and cons of each approach. Having the EPA declare carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases dangerous pollutants would avoid the need to have Congress pass federal legislation to cap CO2 emissions. Many view such passage as difficult this year given the economic recession. EPA regulation has its own problems, not the least of which is whether the Clean Air Act covers carbon dioxide. Also, any ruling the EPA made could be overturned by a new administration. What may happen is that the Obama administration may pursue both approaches for now, with eventual passage of Congressional legislation establishing a cap-and-trade system regulating greenhouse gas emissions.

 
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Spot climate change in your backyard

As we get closer to Spring, this short article published in CNN’s SciTechBlog becomes more and more relevant.  It urges people to become volunteer backyard scientists by participating in Project BudBurst, which is enlisting people all over the country to report when their plants bloom. These reports, when combined, will help scientists track trends in climate change.  The article also suggests that people learn abour their local environment, and try to find local food, either through food coops, public gardens, or farmers’ markets. Check out the links contained in this story, then go exercise your green thumb.

 
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