Facebook Twitter Gplus RSS
magnify
formats

5 ‘must dos’ for the green home

From this week’s Green Home in the New York Times, here are 5 ways to green your own home.  The list is provided here, read the article for complete details.  All of these ways will not only reduce your impact on the environment, but will help you save money in the long run, even if the initial investment is costly.  In general, the ways to green your home are relatively simple and if everyone starts to make these changes, the impact could be tremendous.  

1. Unplug appliances and other electronic devices not in use or install a smart power strip. 

2. Place a soda bottle in your toilet to conserve water. 

3. Install an ultra-low-flow shower head. 

4. Reuse gray water in toilets. 

5. Put in new thermostats that are programmable. 

Can you think of other way’s not listed here to green your home?

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

The recession’s green lining

Despite the hardships we all face in the wake of the economic recession, these tough financial times are providing benefits to the environment in the form of carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Slowed economic growth has caused some of the world’s dirtiest factories to shut their doors, especially in developing nations such as China and Mexico.  Emissions from Europe and the United States are also projected to decline due to the to recession. Around the globe, there are many examples of how environmental quality is improving. It remains to be seen what will happen once economic activity picks up again.  While many nations are trying to use the poor economic conditions to implement emissions reductions and clean environment strategies for the future, there are hints that some of the factories that are shutting down (large emitters of carbon dioxide) could reopen should the demand for the goods

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Recycling gadgets when they go pffft…

Dead cellphone? Old computer? Broken television? 

Looking to get rid of these technologies once their time has expired?

In this weeks The Green Home, a new series in the New York Times, recycling electronics is discussed. Fortunately, many of the gadgets that make our lives easier (for the most part) can be disposed of with the environment.  Items that have only recently stopped working can be restored and given to those in need. Some towns have electronic recycling programs or events and many stores are now allowing customers to drop off old items.  The article provides a list of many websites that can also help you recycle technologies.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Carbon emissions across the United States

Published on March 4, 2009 by in Causes, Science

From the New York Times, here is a fun and useful way to look at the sources of carbon dioxide emissions from each of state.  The emissions are broken down by sector, and while the two largest sources are electricity production and transportation, this is not the case for all states.  The large variance in the sources of these emissions, which are a cause of global warming, complicates the policy making process. 

What do you notice about the emissions from your state? Do you notice any specific geographic trends?  Is population a good indicator of the quantity of emissions?

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Wind power helps ski resort during recession

During these tough economic times, using renewable energy can help save money. 

According to this article from CNN, Jiminy Peak Resort in northern Massachusetts is saving up $450,000 in electricity costs through the use of a wind turbine.  Built in 2007, the wind turbine, known as the Zephyr, generates enough electricity to power approximately 600 homes.  While most of this energy is used during the winter to power the resort’s operations, in the summer months, local homes and businesses also can draw electricity from the turbine.  The complaints voiced against the Zephyr are common wherever wind power is proposed for development.  To some, the turbine is seen as an eyesore and it can also disrupt and harm migrating birds (in the cases bats).

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments