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Back to reality

The Bush administration’s war on science is coming to an end, but can the Obama administration undo all the damage?

 
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News coverage of climate entering “trance”?

Published on December 8, 2008 by in Admin

If it’s really true that media coverage of climate change has plateaued — or is declining — who or what is to blame for this “trance?” Speculation suggests the culprits may include the global economic meltdown, falling oil prices, and disaster fatigue. Whether the reduced coverage is actual or perceived, governments may interpret it as reduced public pressure to devise and implement strong environmental policies.

ClimateYou does its part by disseminating articles on all aspects of climate change as widely as possible.

 
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The Life of an Antarctic Archipelago

Biological life near Antarctica is apparently flourishing, a study of biodiversity recently reported in the NY Times. Not only did scientists find greater biodiversity than they expected, they also determined that, in contrast to other regions, biodiversity had changed little in recent centuries. This finding provides a baseline for studying the changes in resident species caused by climate change. Scientists predict that with a two degree Celcius rise in Antarctic temperatures, most species of penguins living in the Orkneys would be, like the polar bears of the Artic, in danger of extinction.

 
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Buying dry land in response to sea level rise

An interesting response to sea level rise and coastal flooding caused by global climate change is discussed in this article from the New York Times. In the Maldives, a nation of over 1,000 islands in the Indian Ocean, the new president plans to start an investment fund, financed in part by earnings from tourism, that will allow the country to buy a haven for citizens should flooding from sea level rise become significant. India and Sri Lanka are two areas which have been identified as potential places of refuge.

The article makes no mention of how much money would be required to purchase any land or any of the other costs associated with moving the entire population of the nation, which in recent years has grown rapidly to over 400,000 people. Does this strategy seem like a good idea?

 
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In Mayor’s plan, the plastic bag will carry a fee

This article from the New York Times discusses a plan for New York City, proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, to start charging shoppers 6 cents for every plastic bag they use while in stores. Similar proposals have been explored in other cities in the United States and have been successfully implemented in Europe. Along with reducing waste, the plan for New York could potentially generate an additional $16 million in revenue for the city. While many conservationists are applauding the plan, some city residents fear the fee, which is not a tax, will cause unnecessary aggravation and strain personal budgets even further.

 
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