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Barnes Ice Cap shrinking more and more by City Tech Blogger Kristina Colon

The Barnes Ice Cap, considered the last remaining piece of the major glacier Laurentide Ice Sheet that once blanketed Canada and much of the northern United States  is being threatened by global warming a new study says. In a recent article by Brian Kahn at ClimateCentral.org, he wrote “Humans are in the process of changing the planet in a way that hasn’t happened in 2.6 million years.”

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The ice cap reached stability on Baffin Island 2,000 years ago. But rising temperatures has made the island stable no longer, and as a result, the bowling pin shaped Barnes Ice Cap is becoming smaller and smaller. The ice cap started getting smaller at a steady pace around the 1990’s and as of now, is only the size of the state of Delaware. The blame is attributed to human carbon pollution which has driven up global temperatures. Scientists say if rising temperatures keep up at the same pace, the Banes Ice Cap will be gone in 300 years.

 
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Climate Change & the future of Africa by City Tech Blogger Thierno Ibrahima Diallo

Africa is the continent which is facing terrible consequences due to the climate change. According to the article written by Claudia ten Have of United Nations University, published in July 06th 2008, titled “Africa and Climate Change”, many deleterious changes from climate change is to be expected for the future. According to Claudia, “Africa is set to experience:

  • Significant increases in temperature by 2010, particularly in the Sahel and part of southern Africa;
  • Dramatic decreases in precipitation, declining by more than 20% compared to levels 20 years ago; and
  • More frequent and intense tropical storms—parts of the continent will see a 20% increase in cyclone activity.”

It is urgent that the leaders from each part of the world contribute in the amelioration of greenhouse gases.

 

 
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Alaska’s Permafrost releases more carbon by City-Tech Blogger Branden Harris

The CO2 emission levels or Carbon dioxide levels have been rising steadily and it’s causing concern, especially in Alaska. Data extracted from satellites and air crafts show that the amount of CO2 emitted from Alaska has increased by 70% between 1975-201 5 between October and December each year. This is because Alaska’s permafrost, a frozen mass found about meter below Alaska’s surface which has held carbon for around 40,000 years, has started to thaw. Soils in Alaska previously took about a month to freeze over but now it can take up to 3 months or longer to freeze. The entire region of Alaska is monitoring the carbon release numbers that are a result of climate change.

 

 
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Climate Change Killing the Great Barrier Reef by City-Tech Blogger Kristina Colon

One a recent segment of Leading Edge on PBS, they talked about how climate change is destroying the Great Barrier Reef. The Great Barrier Reef is about the half the size of Texas, but is steadily growing smaller and dying due to the oceans rising temperatures. Two thirds of the corals in the northern part Great Barrier Reef died off last year. This was considered the worst reef casualty in history. This year is predicted to be worse than the last. Because the algae in the reef is extremely sensitive to temperature, they begin to photosynthesize too fast and expel too much energy. Because the reef is home to over most marine life, the rapid death of the Great Barrier Reef is definitely a sign of worry. Watch the video here.

 
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Greener more, icy less by City-tech Blogger Dave

When you think of Antarctica you usually think of a frozen wasteland with ice and snow covering everything. A new study shows that might not always be the truth in the future as the earth’s temperatures rise. Based on a study from the University of Exeter they found that the changes to the ecology of the area are unprecedented. The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest-warming places on the planet. The growth of moss around the Antarctic Peninsula has greatly increased over the last 50 years due to the rise in temperatures. The group is trying to date core samples back to 1000 years so they can get a better picture of how things were before human induced climate change. Here’s a cool video about the extreme changes near the antarctic peninsula and the Extreme Ice Survey team on an expedition to South Georgia Island near the Antarctic Peninsula.

 
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