Facebook Twitter Gplus RSS
magnify
formats

Coincidence, Prediction or War? What is going on that we don’t know? by CITI-tech blogger Sergio Carrillo

Photo Credit: Rebecca Blackwell / AP

Lately, Mexico has been shaken by several earthquakes in a row. These earthquakes started on September 7, 2017. One occurred with a magnitude of 8.2 killing hundreds of people. This was followed by another earthquake on September 19, with a magnitude of 7.2 causing infrastructure damage, and costing hundreds of lives. The devastation was continued with a 6.2 magnitude earthquake on Saturday September 23, 2017. A catastrophic event happened exactly 32 years ago, first with an earthquake with magnitude of 8.0 in September 19, 1985. These have been the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history, killing thousands of people and collapsing many buildings in the city of Mexico. Finally, followed by two foreshocks, one the next day with a magnitude of 7.5 and the other one seven months later with a magnitude of 7.0.

 

According to this data can we predict an event and be prepared? Is it a coincidence that an earthquake happens the same day 32 years after, or is something else is going on and we don’t know about it? Can climate change be an impact? What are countries like the United States of America doing to fight these events?

I personally think that is time for all of us to be careful on choices we make, like: who we want to represent us around the world and to be more cautious with mother nature. We can start bad events involving mother nature but I strongly believe that we are not capable of stopping natural disasters like these.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

OUR TAKE: The New Wave of Climate Refugees From Puerto Rico

An article last week on the dire status of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria said to expect one of the largest mass migration flows to the United States in recent history. Reporters Daniel CusickAdam Aton predicted tens of thousands of storm victims will flee the island to start new lives in the United States and will join other “climate refugees” from southernmost Louisiana and the shrinking islands of Alaska’s Bering Strait. Yesterday, (Oct. 2) Jake Godin of abc2news.com concurred that climate change is on course to create more refugees and mass migrations and “sudden-onset disasters like floods, storms and wildfires displace an average of 21.5 million people every year worldwide.”

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/climaterefugeestalkintlstudies9-150929034421-lva1-app6892/95/climate-refugees-uncertainty-and-insecurity-3-638.jpg?cb=1443498675

 

Here at ClimateYou we think the estimated 200,000 refugees the article cites is probably based on 5% of 3.4 million rounded up. How realistic is that likely to be? Very hard to say, especially given the still unknown speed, scale and efficacy of the Federal disaster relief effort. Latin family ties bind, so many Puerto Rican U.S. residents will help out, either with recovery/rebuilding or support for temporary or permanent immigration to the States. Another factor is the economic: job prospects here versus there. PR economy was hurting, anemic, long before Maria, the government was/is bankrupt. The U.S. economy has largely recovered from the 2008-’09 great recession, if unevenly. The Fed is cautiously optimistic about US growth going forward; it has started winding down its balance sheet after a long period of pump-priming; the stock market remains buoyant amid growing skepticism that Trump’s campaign-touted tax reform and infrastructure agenda items will ever be enacted. How much of PR industry survived the storm is still unknown. How much capital investment will “relief” entail? Probably very little. Here at ClimateYou, we expect a long, very slow economic recovery, which will exacerbate the ‘push’ immigration factors. It’s unlikely PR’s agriculture will rebound very far or fast. Maybe a few more light industry tax-free zones in food or clothing processing/finishing might have to happen. Island economies face tough constraints; many products and raw materials have to be imported by sea or air, and finished products exported, both of which raise costs. There’s tourism, but PR has been out-branded, out-invested, out-promoted, and out-drawn. Possibilities for tourism development exist — tropical weather, beaches, Old San Juan, relative proximity, especially for East coast Americans who come to PR where English is fairly widely spoken, no currency conversion needed, no visa nor passport required. It would take a few years, but it’s doable. There are a few hurdles to surmount (too near, too de-classed, foreign but not foreign enough), but should be doable, and would provide PR with long-term economic viability. First-blush guess at political implications of an influx of Puerto Ricans mainly to NY, NJ, and FL (in FL, anti-Castro Cuban influence would be diluted), would favor Democrats, especially if Trumpian/Republican relief effort is perceived as too little, too late, too racist, too grudging, too inadequate entirely to the scale of the humanitarian crisis, as is already starting to be seen. Our bet is the 200,000 refugee inflow estimate will prove to be low; it could easily double.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Hurricane History and the Dominican Republic by CityTech Blogger Maria De Leon

For decades, the Dominican Republic has always been caught in the eye of the hurricane. The country just experienced this again with Hurricanes Irma and Maria, where there was much damage and has reminded many of Hurricane George in September 1998, a hurricane that is engraved in the Dominicans’ memories, even though it was a category  3. The 12 foot waves devastated Santo Domingo city, causing over 300 fatalities and extensive damage, Santo Domingo was affected by floods, sea level rise, and famine. This tropical storm affected the agriculture, tourism and other sectors important for the growth of the Island. The communities of Punta Cana and the Malecón of Santo Domingo were partially destroyed.

The country from that point on understood that we had to adapt to climate change and that it was a real threat. We have seen much flooding, and you can see here how the Dominican Republic is dealing with flooding after Maria.  Also, ocean acidification and beach erosion is happening at an increasing rate, just like it is in many other vulnerable Caribbean nations. We have seen how climate change has given us warmer ocean temperatures and ocean acidification — a killer for coral reefs that, like mangroves, provide sanctuary for smaller fish. To protect this beautiful Island for future natural disasters, we shall start taking care of our environment. Thus, when a hurricane as harmful as George, Irma or Maria comes we will be prepared. As I said before, to help to solve climate change, we shall start by taking care of our planet and loving it as one’s self.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Next Tropical Storm is Easy on the Rain and Wind

The next tropical storm is moving towards Florida and heavy rain is expected there and in Cuba, according to weather.com    One to three inches of rain is predicted to fall in parts of south and east Florida, the Florida Keys, and northwest Bahamas and some flash flooding may happen. This “tropical depression” isn’t expected to knock out any power lines as happened during Hurricane Irma on September 10 when more than 4.4 million FPL customers were without power due to downed power lines. Since then, residents like those living in Coral Gables are considering a multi-million dollar plan to put their power lines underground. That stronger and more intense hurricanes are due to global warming and climate change have convinced many that protecting power lines is absolutely necessary.

According to the Washington Post, a majority of Americans believe the severe hurricanes just experienced are because of climate change. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll reveals a spike in those seeing the connection than in a 2005 Post-ABC poll taken just weeks after Hurricane Katrina.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 
formats

Airplane Exhaust: Harmful Inside and Out by CityTech blogger Viki Bailey

Studies say that any type of toxic pollutant kills thousands. We know that airplane crashes kill people but what about airplane releases of exhaust? Emissions from planes flying above 3,000 feet can have as harmful exhaust as it does landing. Last year the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) declared that jet engine exhaust endangers public health by contributing to climate change, and that large commercial jets account for 11% of all emissions from the global transportation sector. Aircraft emissions are expected to grow by 50% by 2050 as more and more people travel by air. Under the Clean Air Act the EPA has worked on imposing limits on aircraft emissions. Jet engine exhaust throws off greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, warming the atmosphere and trapping heat from the sun, which drives climate change. Those toxic exhaust emissions also threaten our health. Steven Barrett, an aeronautical engineer of the Cambridge Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says airplane exhaust contains sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides just like automobiles. Researchers have theorized that airplane pollutants can change a person’s DNA in as little as three days. Particulate matter may include tiny bits of dust, metal, or soot in the air which can lodge deep in the human lungs. Many of these particles of pollution are tiny, maybe about a hundred millionths of an inches wide, but can affect human health and enter the bloodstream. There are about 8,000 deaths a year from airplane pollution. The main cause of air pollutant deaths is cardiovascular, namely lung cancer and respiratory diseases. No one even considers the toxic pollutants airplanes release. How do airplanes pollutants affect human health? The plane flies at cruising altitude, then wind whisks the pollutants from the sky to the Earth’s ground level. Airplane emissions cause about 40 deaths each year which is information I don’t think frequent flyers know about. The air pollutants should not just be blamed on automobile and factories. Airplanes are also a part of the list of noxious releases into the air. Quoted from Mr. Barrett:  “Regulators need to explicitly consider the impact of cruise emissions on human health.” These findings may someday cause the industry to rebuild airplanes to diminish the contaminants that are released due to flying.

https://www.mnn.com/green-tech/transportation/stories/nasa-wants-to-build-worlds-most-efficient-plane

But scientists and engineers are working towards a 10% cut in emissions by 2022; British budget airline easyJet has just announced that it could be flying electric passenger jets on short-haul routes within a decade by using more fuel-efficient jets, such as the new Airbus A320neo.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments