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OUR TAKE: Getting Warmer & Why

This important article starts off arcane — reporting on a study of stalagmites in a Russian cave — and ends with an apocalyptic warning — we’re heating the climate 20 to 50 times faster than ever before. The study helps to resolve a disparity — the article calls it a conundrum — between computer models of past climate change and data analyses for the same period. We tend to trust data and distrust simulations but the study showed that with better data, the analysis supported the simulation. Ice ages happen because the earth’s orbit is elliptical. During ice ages, when the earth is relatively far from the sun, winters are colder, summers cooler. As the earth in its orbit gets closer to the sun, summers get warmer, winters less cold, glaciers melt and retreat, and the ice age ends. This last happened over the period 15-10,000 years ago. About 7,000 years ago, that trend stabilized and earth began a long, slow warming trend. Since then, the earth has warmed about 0.5°C. During that time, humans adopted agriculture, created civilizations, multiplied, and prospered. GISS Global surface temperature Data

However, about 200 years ago, we began the Industrial Revolution, burning large quantities of fossil fuels, and emitting greenhouse gases which accelerated the slow warming trend. It took only 170 years to double the temperature rise of the previous 7000. In the last 40 years, thanks to growing population and prosperity, we are increasing the temperature by 20 times. If we miss the Paris Agreement target of limiting the global rise to 2°C, we could experience a heat rise rate 50 times faster than ever before. Catastrophe looms.

 
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Predicting future Hurricanes by City-Tech Blogger Branden Harris

People are still mourning the loss of lives of families and friends that were tragically killed in last year’s East Coast hurricane, Matthew. This occurrence left not only trauma, but $10 billion in damages in the United States alone. Having said that, the coastal areas are once again preparing for another hurricane season. hurricane outlook

Credit: NOAA

Forecasters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted for 11-17 storms to form of which “five to nine are expected to become hurricanes, and two to four major hurricanes. Unfortunately, there is no telling when, where, and how the storms might hit.

 

 

 

 

 
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OUR TAKE: Making Climate Science Less Boring & More Emotional

This opinion piece out of Australia, is all about communication. The scientists have been hammering their message that climate change is real, it’s a clear and present danger, and, yes, we’ve caused most of it ourselves by burning fossil fuels in our cars, factories, and power plants. However, the scientists’ facts, figures, graphs, and consensus touting have mostly fallen on deaf ears. Climate boredom is rampant. What’s lacking is emotion.

cliscie commun

(Imperial College of London)

The facts need to be tied to human concerns. To project climate trends to 2100 causes MEGO (My Eyes Glaze Over) in most people. Some savvy scientists have added human timelines to the projections — your lifetime, your kids’, your grand-kids’. That connects. A light goes on. Understanding dawns. Now, let’s converse.

 

 

 
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Solar & Renewable Energy forges ahead in India by City Tech Blogger Branden Harris

India is moving swiftly in the direction of a greener future and is on track to exceed expectations towards achieving their goals on renewable energy. According to a Climate Central article, India is the world’s third largest carbon polluter and the country has pledged to dramatically increase its renewable energy capacity and limit catastrophic temperature increases. The price of solar energy gas already dropped due to the falling of cost in borrowing money aiding in the record low prices this year. By 2022, India aims to have the capacity to generate 175 gigawatts of power from solar, biomass and wind energy.

 
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Increasing Sahel storms in West Africa by City-Tech Blogger Mariano Huaman

A new study has found that in West Africa Sahel climate change is making a difference in the storms. This area is between the Atlantic and the Red Sea. Climate change impacts has upset rainfall patterns making storms three times stronger than in the previous years. Sahel storms are considered among the most powerful around the world. In 2009, they caused flooding in Burkina Faso forcing 150,000 families to leave their homes. Scientists predict that in three decades, global warming will cause extreme events such as droughts, floods, heat waves and tropical cyclones.

 
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