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What about that 3%? by CityTech Blogger Jonathan Yee

By now, just about everyone knows the often-cited statistic: 97% of papers agree that anthropogenic climate change (ACC, referred to as AGW in the article) is real. The remainder consists of dissenting papers that reject ACC– a total of 38 papers. As it turns out, those papers had not undergone peer review prior to being published and cited. In November 2016, a research paper was published in Theoretical and Applied Climatology Journal that reviewed these 38 contrarian papers. All of these papers contained major flaws, such as starting with false assumptions, neglecting context, cherry-picking data, misrepresentation of statistics, and even erroneous analysis.

https://futurism.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/climate_change-600×960.png

For example, some of these papers claimed that the sun’s effect on global climate was such that greenhouse gases would have no effect, even though common sense tells us that both solar energy and greenhouse gases are mutually dependent factors in climatology. All the greenhouse gases in the universe would do nothing without an energy source, and celestial bodies cannot maintain their surface temperature without an insulating medium above the planet’s surface.

Cherry-picking data is said to be one of the cardinal sins of research, yet this was exactly what a number of these 38 papers did, using only favorable results and simply throwing out the unfavorable ones. Just as egregious is simply ignoring the greater context of the results or other data involved in generating the models, yet some of these papers are guilty of that, too.

Some papers “presented implausible or incomplete physics,” according to this article. The entire basis of climatology is based in physics, yet there are papers being cited that contain implausible physics. None of the results in these 38 papers could be replicated, meaning that the models used were tuned to provide a particular result. Katharine Hayhoe, the article’s lead author, commented, “Every single one of those analyses had an error — in their assumptions, methodology, or analysis — that, when corrected, brought their results into line with the scientific consensus.”

So what does this mean? Anthropogenic climate change is no longer a scientific consensus. It is a scientific unanimity. Now, science isn’t absolutely perfect or correct all the time. Indeed, science never stops evolving. However, climate change is one issue that humanity cannot simply leave for tomorrow. Even if all the scientists in the world are wrong about climate change, the potential consequences of ignoring their warnings so vastly outweigh the potential benefits that it is not worth the risk. We have nowhere else to go. We cannot simply pack our bags and go to the planet next door. Even if the scientific unanimity is wrong, we can only benefit from the large scale sustainability research and development.

 
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IT’S CLIMATE WEEK NYC 2017!

This is Climate Week NYC 2017 which runs until Sunday, September 24.  Climate Week was first launched by The Climate Group in 2009, bringing together government, scientists and business leaders from all over the world. The week long program is being held at the Morgan Library and seeks to further the goals of the Paris Agreement by limiting the world’s temperature to less than a 2°C increase this century, and work towards sustainable practices. Climate Week NYC 2017 will highlight the growing number of global companies formally committed to climate change targets. This year over 300 companies, including Adobe, Merck, Nike, United Technologies and the Spanish telecommunications giant Telefónica, have announced their commitment to carbon emissions reduction targets. The high profile businesses follow the guidelines set by the Science Based Targets initiative, which maps a strategy for businesses to stay competitive while taking steps to mitigate climate change.

https://www.greenbiz.com/article/top-headlines-climate-week-2017
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Concurrent with Climate Week is the Fifth Annual International Conference on Sustainable Development (ICSD) on September 18-19, 2017, at Columbia University in New York City. It is part of the INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. This year’s conference theme is “The World in 2050: Looking Ahead for Sustainable Development” where governments spokespersons, academia, the United Nations,  international agencies, NGOs, and grassroots organizers  will share practical solutions towards achieving more sustainable and inclusive societies.

 

 
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Our Take: Bury the Power Grid

It ought to be clear to everyone but ostrich Republicans that the climate and the oceans are warming, which means that there are and will be more frequent and more intensive storms. Since 2005 mega-storms have devastated New Orleans (Katrina), New York/New Jersey (Sandy), Houston (Harvey), and now Miami (Irma). In all cases, flooding from rain and storm surges caused widespread devastation, and millions lost power for days or weeks from downed power lines. Will your city be next? What can be done to prepare for the next big blow?

One obvious step is to bury the power grid. The country’s electric grid is over 130 years old. (The first electric grid dates back to 1882 when Thomas Edison opened the country’s first power plan in lower Manhattan). Today’s grid is increasingly obsolete and vulnerable. New, cheaper, safer, and more efficient paradigms are being implemented, for example in Vermont. It makes great good economic sense to replace vulnerable old copper wire grids with buried optical cable ones post haste. Sure, doing so will be costly, but think of the cost of millions of households and businesses without power for days or weeks. The next big storm will happen somewhere soon. Will your city/area be ready?

 
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Waters Run Deep by CityTech Blogger Krystal Valdez

According to a recent study done by students and professors at Portland State University, Department of Geology, it has been discovered that one of the largest glaciers in America located at Wind River Range Wyoming are melting. Roughly around 70 years ago researchers first measured one of the glaziers called Dinwoody, and they calculated the area to be about 850 acres of snow. Fifty years later researchers returned to measure Dinwoody once again and discovered only about 540 acres of snow left in the mountains. Residents of Wyoming depend greatly on these glaciers for their water supply, especially for their cattle and for industrial purposes such as water to run power plants. Many state officials have started planning for surviving droughts. Fortunately, enough local residents are near the Green River which also supplies water for their everyday use and can be used as a backup plan for water needed if snowmelt slows in its production of water.

https://snowbrains.com/nasa-glacier-national-park-could-lose-all-its-glaciers-by-2030/

We as a nation keep hearing news on global warming and we know of simple acts we can do to help our mother earth against global warming. But we chose to ignore the signs. It never really hits us how drastic these situations actually are until we are being affected by them.  And by the time we all chose to react, it may be too late to turn back around. Just because we don’t live near these places such as Wind River Range in Wyoming, does not mean that global warming won’t affect us in our cities. It’s just like my mother says, waters run deep, and in this case, they can run deep enough to drown us out if glaciers such as these keep melting in Wyoming and especially in Antarctica.

 
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Caribbean Islands Should Prepare for Climate Change by CityTech Blogger David Perez Ramos

According to National Centers for Environmental Information (NOAA), average, global temperatures at the surface of the earth has warmed from 12.7°C to 13.75°C (1.05°C higher) since the start of the 20th century. Other evidence that shows global temperature has increased since the 19th century is the rise in sea level of 10 to 25 centimeters. This is due to the melting of mountain glaciers and the expansion of seawater caused by a rise in temperature.

The accumulation of Greenhouse Gases (GHG’s) which are primarily carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere are causing a warming effect on our planet. Human activities such as burning fossil fuels to produce energy accounts for 80 to 85 percent of the carbon dioxide that is added to the atmosphere. Developed countries such as United States, China, and Europe, are the main producers of greenhouse gases. Industrialized countries may not suffer too much from global warming because they have resources to produce procedures and strategies to prevent damage from sea level increase. However, small developing islands such as the Caribbean may suffer greater consequences due to the expansion of seawater.

Islands in the Caribbean territory such as the Dominican Republic, The Bahamas, and Barbados are in danger and can suffer great damage due to climate change impacts such as sea level rise. Caribbean territories are one of the most vulnerable to tropical storms. With warmer seawater, tropical storms form and intensify more often due to more moisture which produces more rain resulting in disastrous precipitation and flooding in these small countries. Countries like the Dominican Republic and Haiti have a large, poor population and government help almost never reaches them. Due to this, people are forced to build-up their own houses with no engineering standards to withstand tropical storms and flooding. Every time a hurricane passes through these undeveloped countries, a lot of lives are lost and countless homes are destroyed from heavy  rainfall and strong flooding.

Now that the world is experiencing more natural disasters than before due to climate change provoking more natural disasters, it is time for these small countries and islands to try to get more resources and preparations to prepare for future natural disasters such as hurricanes.

 
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